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Open Network Society

Current and relevant management knowledge regarding  motivation and engagement – really widely backed by science – and therefore part of our #mustread #mustsee list.

Daniel Pink crushes the outdated myth that motivation could be generated by money or payment equivalent. A bonus would just work in the case of physical labour but not in the environment of knowledge work. If you want motivation and engagement in the workforce today there’s a few cornerstones to look at, and according to Pink’s talk those are self-direction, mastery and purpose.

Dieses Video und das dazugehörige Buch “DRIVE” sind inzwischen Management Klassiker geworden und verdienen deshalb einen Eintrag in unserer Rubrik “Was wir lesen” – und somit weiterempfehlen.

Daniel Pink CC BY -SA 3.0 Dhpmccullought

Daniel Pink is linguist and earned a doctorate in law from Yale. He wrote several books e.g. DRIVE, to which this talk is related.

Read more about him on his Wikipedia page or on his website www.danpink.com.

Youtube provides quite a…

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TIME

How Can You Spend Time Wisely?

We all wonder where the hours go. There’s a good reason for that — we’re absolutely terrible at remembering how we really spend our time.

Via What the Most Successful People Do at Work: A Short Guide to Making Over Your Career:

Hunting through data from the American Time Use Survey, conducted annually by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and other time diary projects, I came to the inescapable conclusion that how we think we spend our time has little to do with reality. We wildly overestimate time devoted to housework. We underestimate time devoted to sleep. We write whole treatises glorifying a golden age that never was; American women, for instance, spend more time with their children now than their grandmothers did in the 1950s and 60s.

Nowhere is this truer than with work. Are you a workaholic spending 75+ hours at…

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Words dipped in Happiness

Have you ever imagined why the analog clocks displayed time as 10:10 in most of the time? Try to guess. No idea? Ok. Because 10:10 is the perfect time when we can see the clock in its full flying mode. Two wings, one on number 10, and one on number 2, are flapping rapidly at their own pace and taking the time away from us. Because time never comes back. It goes away and away. Have you seen the tail of this flying time-bird? Yes that one n

image

umber 6.

So always remember time flies away with time. It doesn’t stop for anyone. So enjoy the moments. The temporary moments. They never come back. We only go to them so that we can live there. But remember, we can never live in past, just “some memories in the past, can make your present lively.”

So start living in your present…

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What is behavioral? A blog of recent updates to behavioral economics

These Scientists Want to Fix Your Terribly Disorganized Calendar

Each weekday morning, energized with the optimism of a new day, I scrawl out a lengthy to-do list, detailing all the things I hope to accomplish by the end of the day. And then, inevitably, somewhere around 5 p.m., I look at the list again, this time with dismay at how many boxes are left unchecked. And you, too, probably have the best intentions for your days. You’ll go for a run! Finish a project ahead of deadline! Call your mom! It’s the actual doing of these things that’s the hard part — even, confusingly, when you very much intend and even want to do them. The problem of human productivity is a deceptively complicated one, and, as such, the targeted tech market is crowded — in the iPhone app store alone, there are 1,562 options for “time management,” and 2,195…

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Waiting…

Ryan Tennis is a talented singer and songwriter with funny and deep lyrics. In this video-clip sponsored by Mojo-Drink he talks about time and how it feels to wait… Who doesn’t know this feeling?

So it’s here: The Apple Watch. What’s the verdict?

“It’s a gorgeous piece of hardware with a clever and simple user interface and some fine built-in functions. It already has more than 4,000 third party apps. I will probably buy one,” writes Walt Mossberg after wearing a demo Apple Watch for more than one month.

“But it’s a fledgling product whose optimal utility lies mostly ahead of it as new watch software is developed. I got the strong feeling that third-party app developers taking their first swing at the thing simply hadn’t yet figured out how best to write software for it—especially since Apple, for now, is requiring that watch apps basically be adjuncts of iPhone apps.”

Because, after all, the best hardware comes with a variety of well-written, complimentary software.

It’s why, for example, in law firm management the best time savers are not thanks to Timex, rather…

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